Investigators from the Barrie Police Service have arrested and charged a city man with extortion, police report.
On Friday, Oct. 5 shortly after 9 a.m. investigators of the Barrie Police Investigative Services, assisted by the Biker Enforcement Unit, made the arrest. The man was arrested Friday morning shortly before 9 a.m. He was being held for a bail hearing.
Due to the ongoing nature of this investigation, further details will only be provided as the investigation permits, police report.
The Biker Enforcement Unit (BEU) is a Joint Forces Operation (JFO) created in June 1998. The BEU is comprised of 18 municipal agencies, the RCMP and CISO, partnered with its lead agency, the Ontario Provincial Police. This multi-agency partnership is a demonstration of Ontario law enforcement’s shared interest in combating organized crime in their respective communities, police report.
The unit is comprised of over 100 officers from federal, provincial and municipal police agencies, as well as the Criminal Intelligence Service of Ontario.

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Advance polling for Barrie council starts Saturday

The voting for the coming municipal election starts Saturday in Barrie, with an advance polling station to be set up at the Barrie Farmers’ Market (70 Collier Street) from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Oct. 6 marks the first of many opportunities to vote in the 2018 Municipal Election. Other voting opportunities include:
• Oct. 9-11: Apartment & Condo voting
• Oct. 10-12: Long Term Care & Retirement Residence voting
• Oct. 13 & 15-17: Voting bus (Barrie Transit bus turned into a fully accessible polling station that will visit scheduled locations throughout Barrie​)
• Oct. 18-20: Advance Voting Days (20 locations around Barrie)
• Oct. 22: Final Voting Day (20 locations around Barrie).
Residents are encouraged to check if they’re on the voters’ list before heading to the polls by going to barrie.ca/VoterLookup, calling 705-728-VOTE (8683) from Monday to Friday, 8:30 – 4:30 p.m., visiting 1st floor City Hall (70 Collier Street) Monday to Friday, 8:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Additions or changes to the voters’ list are permitted up to and including final voting day (Oct. 22, 2018). For more information on the 2018 Municipal Election including who can vote and a full schedule of voting times and locations, visit barrie.ca/election.

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City services impacted on Thanksgiving Monday

As the community gathers with friends and family to celebrate Thanksgiving this weekend, the City is reminding them a number of services will be affected on Monday, Oct. 8.

Barrie Transit
There will be no Barrie Transit Service on Thanksgiving Monday. (www.barrie.ca/TransitNotices)

Curbside Collection
There will be no garbage, organics, recycling and yard waste collection on Monday in Barrie. Collection during the week of this holiday will occur one day later for the remainder of the week. Materials must be curbside by 7 a.m. on your collection day. (www.barrie.ca/CurbsideCollection). Note: The landfill is closed regularly every Sunday and Monday.

Recreation Centres
All City recreation facilities will be open during regular operating hours on Monday, Oct. 8. Drop-in programs will operate as per the regular drop-in schedule (www.barrie.ca/dropins), however all registered programs are cancelled.

Parking
Downtown parking (on-street and lots) is free on all statutory holidays. Waterfront parking is enforced 24/7/365. Residents must display their permits and visitors are required to pay $3/hour (daily maximum: $15). (www.barrie.ca/parking).

City Hall
Barrie City Hall will be closed on Monday.

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Barrie police have laid charges relating to damage done to a police cruiser parked on Dunlop Street in downtown Barrie, Saturday, Sept. 15.
The incident occurred just after 1:30 a.m. Witnesses, say police, reported seeing a male jumping up onto the trunk of the cruiser, while being videotaped by his friend. The male then jumped on the back window, which quickly led to him smashing out the rear window, and falling through.
Both males fled the area prior to police arriving, although the entire incident had been observed by numerous witnesses and captured on video surveillance.
Investigators have charged a 19-year-old man from Shelburne with Mischief Under $5,000 and a 19-year-old man from Melancthon Township with Mischief Under $5,000. Both men are scheduled to appear in a Barrie Court of Justice on Nov. 5.

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The Barrie Food Bank is in the midst of its annual Thanksgiving Food Drive, aiming to raise 150,000 pounds of food to feed its monthly client base of close to 2,800 people.
Beginning Sept. 26, the drive sees donation bins in grocery stores throughout the city. Local businesses also contribute by collecting food donations at their locations, all with the goal off helping those in need. In all, the agency headquartered at 42 Anne Street assists more than 33,000 people a year.
The bank’s “primary service is the provision of food to families and individuals to prevent them from going hungry,” it says on its website.
“We do this through two key programs: A morning drop-in program held Monday to Friday from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. The drop-in is designed to allow clients to pick up breads and baked goods to supplement their food assistance order.
“The afternoon program, held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1-3:30 p.m., is designed to allow people to acquire food assistance.”
A key part of the agency’s job, it continues, is the encouragement of self-sufficiency and well-being. Services include a resource centre “of brochures and literature is available for our clients to use referring them to other more knowledgeable services and agencies.”
For more on the food bank, click here.

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The bloom is on for Barrie as the city received recognition at the 2018 National/International Symposium and Awards Ceremonies.
At the ceremony held Sept. 29 in Strathcona County, Alberta the city earned a 5 Blooms – Gold rating and a special mention for Military Heritage Park. Barrie also received an Outstanding Achievement Award for the National Capital Commission Floral Displays Award, and participated in the Circle of Excellence – Evaluated category.
Over the summer, trained volunteer judges travelled to participating communities to evaluate the overall contributions of municipal council and departments in regards to the following criteria: tidiness, environmental action, heritage conservation, urban forestry, landscape and floral displays.
Following their evaluation, volunteer judges Bob Lewis and John Lohuis wrote:
“Barrie … has consistently outpaced the national growth rate. The Barrie CiB Committee theme of ‘Grow with Us’ demonstrates wise planning investments for growth. Numerous studies and positive planning in all sectors allows Barrie to meet future challenges.
“A high degree of public engagement and caring is evident with support for high-profile local projects such as Meridian Place and Military Heritage Park. Both projects are adjacent to the beachfront of Kempenfelt Bay. Representatives of Camp Borden, indigenous First Nations and the Barrie Rotary Club all contributed time and resources to Military Heritage Park which was opened in October 2017.
“This un-programmed passive park uses landscapes, plant material, signage and a Vimy oak planting to depict Barrie’s military history from pre-settlement through to present day. Plaques also acknowledge First Nations contributions to the War of 1812.”
For a complete list of the results and the electronic copy of the Communities in Bloom magazine, visit www.communitiesinbloom.ca.

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SIU to investigate death of 55-year-old man

The death of a 55-year-old man who went into medical distress while at the Barrie police station on Sept. 5 is being investigated by the province’s Special Investigations Unit (SIU).
In a news release dated Oct. 1 the SIU says it is “investigating the circumstances surrounding the death” of the man, who died on Sept. 27. According to the unit, “preliminary information suggests the following:”
• On Sept. 5, Barrie Police Service officers arrested the man and took him to the police station. While at the police station, the man went into medical distress
• Emergency Medical Services transported the man to hospital and he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit
• At 11:04 p.m. on Sept. 27, the man was pronounced dead.
“At this time, one subject officer and one witness officer have been designated. The post-mortem is scheduled for today (Oct. 1),” the release states.
The SIU continues that it is “urging anyone who may have information about this investigation to contact the lead investigator at 1-800-787-8529. The unit is also urging anyone who may have any video evidence related to this incident to upload that video through the SIU website.

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Just in case you missed this one, or forgot about it, here’s a look at what you, the taxpayers of Barrie, paid for your city council in 2017 – just in time for the 2018 municipal election.
According to this report the “total remuneration and expenses paid to or on behalf of Members of Council and others by the City of Barrie, and other bodies and local boards for 2017, was $536,564.20.”
Get all the details here. See Q1 2018 council spending here, and Q2 spending here. Council renumeration details can be found here.

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Barrie Culture Days: a behind-the-scenes look at the arts

Click on image for Bath Fitter site

The 9th annual Barrie Culture Days offers a range of activities, including a silent DJ dance party at Meridian Place.
On this weekend (Sept. 28-30), the event features a variety of free programs and activities designed to inspire public participation in arts and culture.
In addition to the dance party other highlights include a culture crawl that includes sketching, theatre, poetry and dance, a drop-in hand drumming workshop, an acapella performance by Barrie’s Soundwaves and a chance for members of the public to conduct the Huronia Symphony Orchestra. Local musicians will perform on select Barrie Transit buses and Barrie’s Emerging Musicians will entertain at various locations in downtown Barrie.
New this year, local artists from PRNT Collective will create printed t-shirts using textures from objects around the city such as metal drain covers and sidewalk grates.
Just Beat It! The search for Simcoe County’s best drummer will take place Saturday from 3–5 p.m. at Five Points Theatre, presented by Pratt Homes & Development. Watch local drummers aged 21 and under compete for the chance to win a cash prize, cymbal pack and more.
The MacLaren Art Centre’s Carnegie Days also takes place over the Culture Days weekend. Carnegie Days is an annual festival of art and language that celebrates the origins of the Art Centre building as the 1917 Carnegie public library with exhibitions, public art projects, lectures, readings, video screenings, workshops and other public programming.
Culture Days is a Canada-wide celebration that was created in response to the growing recognition that a vibrant arts and cultural sector contributes directly to a healthy and stable society. Barrie has been celebrating Culture Days since 2010 with the goal of providing a behind-the-scenes look at the arts.
For a full list of Culture Days events, please visit www.barrie.ca/CultureDays.

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Artistic rendition of proposed Fisher Auditorium arts and event centre

Barrie has taken another step towards the possible revitalizing of the W.A. Fisher Auditorium into a 650-seat theatre and 400-seat event centre.
Monday night, general committee approved a staff recommendation to remove conditions that had been set in relation to a land deal between the City and developer, HIP Barrie Central Inc. (HIP). Conditions included a plan over the presence of Chimney Swifts, birds which have nested on the site for years and are classified as an endangered species.
“HIP has completed studies and has prepared a Mitigation and Restoration Plan that has been accepted by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Vegetation has been removed from the Fisher Property by HIP in accordance with the City Tree Policy. No other Species at Risk issues have been identified,” a staff report informed committee.
If adopted by council next week, the City would sell the Red Storey field, once the football and track field of Barrie Central Collegiate, to HIP, along with a strip of property along Bradford Street. In exchange the City would get the auditorium land. The developer wants to build residential units along Bradford.
The City is hopeful that the Barrie YMCA will integrate its planned new centre into the development of the auditorium, but if that doesn’t turn out to be the case then staff is to report back with potential alternatives “should the YMCA choose to locate elsewhere,” reads the report.
The motion adopted by committee included an increase of $200,000 in the budget of Capital Project #000633 (Fisher Auditorium Redevelopment) “to address costs associated with completing the transactions,” and that “a portion of the allocated funds previously approved … be used to conduct property due diligence activities such as survey, geotechnical, environmental and archaeological investigations.”
According to the report, the 1.465 hectares of the Red Storey field has an agreed purchase price of $5,259,000 (HIP purchase from City), with the property having been appraised in the range of $4,835,000 to $5,054,000.
Another .215 hectares of land along Bradford will be included in the deal. It will be sold to the developer for $955,000. The Fisher Auditorium land comes with a purchase price for the City of $6,214,000.
“The property was appraised by an external appraiser which estimated value for property outside of the floodplain to be $2,906,000 per hectare and property within the floodplain to be $1,453,000 per hectare. The area of the property to be purchased consists of approximately 0.935 hectares outside of the floodplain and 0.849 hectares within the floodplain and equates to an appraised value of $3,951,000.
“In addition to the appraised value of the property, staff have attributed a value to Fisher Auditorium of $1,234,000. The purchase price exceeds the appraisal value by $1,029,000,” reads the report.
The land deals are conditional upon “council approval, due diligence investigations of soil conditions and the simultaneous completion of all the agreements.”
It has been reported that the anticipated costs for the auditorium project are in the neighbourhood of $25 million.
To read the report, click here.

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Proposed townhouse development subject of public meeting

A rezoning is being requested to allow 78 back-to-back townhouse units to be developed on Edgehill Drive

A public meeting was held Monday night in council chambers regarding a rezoning request to permit the construction of a townhouse development on Edgehill Drive.
The application to rezone was  submitted by Innovative Planning Solutions Inc. on behalf of 1980168 Ontario Inc. for lands known municipally as 105, 107, 109, and 111 Edgehill Drive. The rezoning from Residential Single Detached Dwelling Second Density (R2) to Residential Multiple Dwelling Second Density with Special Provisions (RM2-[SP-XXX]) is being requested to allow 78 back-to-back townhouse units within five three-story buildings to be developed.
According to a memo to council regarding the public meeting, special provisions are requested to allow “the development of back-to-back townhouse units, a reduced front yard setback, an increase in maximum lot coverage, maximum gross floor area, building height, and density, a reduction in the number of required parking spaces, and the request to permit unconsolidated amenity space.”
A neighbourhood meeting was held on Sept. 5 with 15 members of the public attending. Matters of concern raised were:
• Traffic circulation and road capacity
• On-site parking capacity
• The health of the stream and its relocation|
• The capacity of local parks and schools.
City planning staff are currently working with the applicant and their consultants, with the primary planning and land use matters under consideration being:
• Proposed built form
• Site design and integration into the local neighbourhood
• Appropriateness of requested site specific amendments
• The health of the natural features and proposed mitigation measures.
In a presentation document from Innovative Planning Solutions, it was stated the development is:
• An appropriate location for high density development
• Has sufficient access to amenities and transportation infrastructure to support additional density
• Has existing variety of housing densities and types along Edgehill Drive
• Intensification along a collector road, as provided in the Official Plan
• One that optimizes the use of existing infrastructure to support growth in a compact and efficient form
• Consistent with Provincial Policy Statement, Growth Plan and City of Barrie’s Official Plan.
It’s expected that staff will have a report prepared for council in December.

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Elementary students going to a city school will be invited to submit an ‘I love Barrie’ essay, an extension of a Ward 10 contest organized by Coun. Mike McCann.
In a memo to council from Rebecca James-Reid, executive director of Access Barrie, it’s explained the contest will be open to students attending elementary schools within city limits for February 2019.
The contest is an extension of the Ward 10 effort “whereby students who live or attend school in (the ward) were invited to submit an essay outlining their favourite things about their home in Barrie. The contest engaged youth in local government and inspired young people to reflect on what they love about their community, with the goal of spreading positivity,” she writes.
For 2019, the contest will expand across the city. Word of the contest will be promoted through a coordinated effort by City and school board staff, and through the City’s regular channels of communication. Participants will be asked to write a 350-500 word essay on why they love Barrie.
Entries can be submitted online via Barrie.ca and in person to Service Barrie. It will launch on Feb. 14 (Valentine’s Day) with a submission deadline of March 28, 2019. The top three submissions will be posted on Barrie.ca, featured on City social media channels and the students will receive an ‘Experience Barrie PrizePack.’
Judges will include the mayor, a councillor and a staff person from Access Barrie.

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Rec Centres celebrating milestones this fall

Barrie’s three recreation centres are celebrating milestone anniversaries this fall and everyone’s invited to join. Each event features a line-up of free fun for the whole family.
Allandale Recreation Centre’s 35th Anniversary – Saturday, September 22, 2 – 7 p.m.

  • 2 – 3 p.m. coffee/tea and cake
  • 3 – 5 p.m. balloon artist, face painting, cotton candy machine, moonwalk bouncers
  • 3 – 4:30 p.m. open swim; underwater photo booth and “try it” snorkel
  • 5 – 7 p.m. open skate to 80’s music

East Bayfield Community Centre’s 15th Anniversary – Saturday, September 29, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

  • 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. inflatable obstacle course, face painting, candy floss, colouring contest, ZOO Tek, Inclusion sensory activities, Lego station, Nerf wars
  • 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. adapted sport hand biking
  • 12:30 – 2 p.m. pickle ball/badminton
  • 12:30 – 1:15 p.m. aqua finning
  • 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. open swim
  • 20 min Samplers: 11:15 a.m. Zumba; 11:45 a.m. Boot Camp; 12:15 p.m. Yoga; 12:45 p.m. On the Ball; 1:15 p.m. Zumba
  • Birthday Party food special: hot dog/popcorn/pop for $1.50

Holly Community Centre’s 10th Anniversary – Saturday, October 13, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

  • 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. arts, crafts, face painting, photo booth
  • 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. camp songs, games
  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. open gym, Lego
  • 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. open swim with Mermaid Demo
  • 12:45 – 2 p.m. family basketball
  • 1 – 2 p.m. giant games
  • 1 p.m. coffee and birthday cake
  • Birthday party food special: hot dog/popcorn/pop for $1.50
  • Time Capsule – bring items reflective of 2018 for inclusion in a special time capsule that will be sealed and opened for Holly’s 20th anniversary in 2028.
  • Also check out Holly’s 3rd Annual Fall Market. Numerous local artisans and vendors will be selling fresh baked goods, jewelry, furniture, clothing, toys, skin care and home décor.
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Police charge Barrie man following stabbing, Friday

A Barrie man, 23, has been charged with offences related to a stabbing Friday night.
On Friday, Sept. 21 just after 8 p.m. police responded to a stabbing in the area of Collier and Clapperton streets, they report. When officers arrived, they located a victim who had sustained an injury after being stabbed.
The victim, a 32-year-old Barrie man, was transported to a local hospital with serious but non-life threatening injuries. Investigators canvassed the area and determined the incident had taken place in the area of Worsley and Clapperton streets and that two men were known to each other, which led to the targeted attack.
Saturday morning, the suspect was located in the area of Toronto and Dunlop streets, and he was arrested without incident. He has been charged with aggravated assault, robbery, and three counts of fail to comply with probation. He will remain in custody and appear in bail court via video remand.

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If included, the patio would add about 1,000 square feet to the existing 8,000 square feet on the terminal’s second floor


 

As part of the City’s arrangement with the Sandbox Entrepreneurship Centre to use the second floor of the downtown transit terminal, staff is recommending the extended rooftop space be included for use as an outdoor patio.
If approved by council, the use of the space would be subject to the centre meeting all building permit requirements and specified conditions of the lease, according to a staff report prepared by Karen Dubeau, director of the creative economy.
Last October council passed a motion supporting the creation of an entrepreneurship centre on the second floor of the terminal. The City agreed to provide an “in-kind contribution towards the initiative by waiving the rent and TUMI (taxes, insurance, maintenance and utilities) costs for the facility. As the vast majority of these costs are already included in the City’s base operating budget, there was no new financial impact to the tax base for the in-kind contribution,” states the report.
It continues that “as a means of protecting taxpayers and ensuring a return on investment made by the City in the form of free rent, taxes, utilities, maintenance and insurance in a publicly owned prime waterfront location, a report be presented to General Committee after the Sandbox’s first three years of operation assessing (its) ability to deliver value to the business, entrepreneurial and broader community, based on performance metrics to be determined.”
The outdoor patio, continues the report, “would add significant benefits to the overall attractiveness of the space … supporting the social and networking collisions intended for businesses and start-ups in the space. The proposed design includes replacing current windows on the south-side wall with larger windows for enhanced views of Kempenfelt Bay, and a large glass sliding door for access to the outdoor patio.”
If included, the patio would add about 1,000 square feet to the existing 8,000 square feet on the terminal’s second floor. The centre, continues the report, has been able to obtain “corporate funding and in-kind materials and services contributions to meet the capital requirements for the implementation of the proposed patio space. Therefore, there would be no financial implications to the City of Barrie’s capital plan.
“The inclusion of an attractive, outdoor patio space and larger windows will increase the overall marketability and property value of the space. The improvement is leveraging private sector dollars to benefit a municipal asset. The use of the space is consistent with, and supportive of, a downtown Creative Hub, and will act as an attractor to the space.”
For more, click here.

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This campus is a partnership between Barrie and County of Simcoe. Once complete, it will house the Barrie Police Service, Simcoe County Paramedic Services and Barrie Fire and Emergency Service dispatch communications in one location at 110 Fairview Road in Barrie.



 

Major site construction of the Barrie-Simcoe Emergency Services Campus is “ongoing and progressing well,” with hard construction costs currently 0.4 per cent under budget, relates a staff memo to council.
“Milestones to be completed prior to the end of 2018 include: total superstructure complete for Building A and foundations complete for Building C, preparation for site works and asphalt, installation of the communication tower, demobilization of both stationary cranes and making the south portion of building A weather tight,” states the memo, written by J. Liefl, manager of facility planning and development.
“Substantial and total project completion are on track to be completed December 2019 and January 2020 respectively.”
This campus is a partnership between Barrie and County of Simcoe. Once complete, it will house the Barrie Police Service, Simcoe County Paramedic Services and Barrie Fire and Emergency Service dispatch communications in one location at 110 Fairview Road in Barrie.
The memo continues that an application to the Municipal Greenhouse Gas Challenge Fund for $4,500,000 “based on proposed energy efficiencies of building mechanical systems at the new” campus was not selected.
Also, a new phosphorus offset policy has been launched by the Lake Simcoe Regional Conservation Authority (LSRCA). As of Jan. 1, 2018 all new developments are required to control 100 per cent of the phosphorus from leaving their property. Work was done to “review and revise the storm water management approach for the campus site,” relates the memo, with site plan approval being achieved on Aug. 22.
“The phosphorous offsetting program was not in place at the time of capital budget approval for the Campus in 2017. The City’s 10-year capital plan forecasts several engineering projects in close proximity, outside the limits of the site, which would result in a zero net phosphorous load, or potentially an offset credit.
“As the City is currently working through capital budget prioritization, it is not feasible at this time to make a specific project commitment, as Council prioritization and approvals will not be completed until March of 2019. The City is (committed) to continue working with the LSRCA … to determine the most suitable projects to be executed within two years of completion of the BSESC project, and … will continue to work with the LSRCA to make suitable arrangements to use any credits that have been generated through this agreement.”
For more on this, click here.

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Police investigate gunshot damage to abandoned home

Barrie police are appealing to the public for assistance after an abandoned home was damaged last Saturday.
Just before 8:30 a.m., police responded to a residence on Dunlop Street West after receiving a report from a witness who observed the front window of an abandoned home damaged as a result of bullet holes.
Investigators have confirmed the home was abandoned, and vacant at the time of the incident, and determined the damaged was a result of a single gunshot to the front window. Investigators canvassed that area and determined the incident occurred early Saturday morning between 2:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m.
There have been no reports of injuries as a result of the incident and the investigation is ongoing.
Anyone with information or who may have residential video surveillance is asked to contact Barrie Police Investigative Services at 705-725-7025, ext. 2129 or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or leave an anonymous tip online at www.p3tips.com

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The image illustrates the type of intensification envisioned along Essa Road and Bradford Street.

A renewal of Barrie’s Official Plan is anticipated to begin this fall, and as part of that process the 2009 Intensification Strategy will be updated.
The review will include an update to the targeted intensification of the Bradford Street/Essa Road corridor, council was informed in a memo prepared by Edward Terry, planner, and Jordan Lambie, senior urban designer.
The OP update, they write, will:
• Allow the City to confirm appropriate locations for nodes along Essa Road as well as additional updates to nodes and corridors
• Consider employment conversions along the corridor
• Explore the potential to designate Allandale GO Station and the New Barrie Transit Terminal as a mobility hub
• Pre-zone sites for mixed-use development along the reminder of the intensification corridors.
The intensification effort dates back to the province’s 2005 Places to Grow Act which “established long-term regional plans for growth, development and land-use policies across the province,” the memo explains.  The 2006 Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe determined population density targets and settlement patterns for Barrie, named in the provincial strategy as a ‘place to grow.’
“While the 2017 Growth Plan identified new targets, the mandate for intensification remains unchanged.”
To meet these directions, the City completed an Intensification Study in 2009 to identify key corridors that should accommodate higher density development.
Those corridors are Essa Road, Yonge Street, Bayfield Street, Dunlop Street West and Duckworth Street. The study assessed Barrie’s “capacity for meeting growth targets” in the province’s growth plan and “provided a vision and established priorities for achieving prescribed growth targets, while also recommending new Official Plan policies and performance standards” for the zoning bylaw “that would facilitate the type of development envisioned for the intensification areas,” continues the memo.
Guidelines set out in 2012 include intensification development that would:
• respectfully blend into the existing built fabric
• create an attractive and safe pedestrian realm
• support transportation of all types
• result in a thoughtful and attractive design that contributes to the local neighbourhoods and the City as a whole.
Policies included in the City’s OP would establish a framework for the design and development of mixed-use buildings in the intensification nodes and corridors, supporting “the creation of a vibrant complete community featuring a mix of uses and activities, with pedestrian oriented development designed to frame abutting sidewalks with active commercial uses located at the street level of new buildings.”
Intensification targets will be met through “short-term design that supports long-term development opportunities” and the “City will generally not support rezoning applications that result in a decrease of density or a reduction in the variety of uses on a property” in mixed-use areas, states the memo.
The scope of the study reaches from Bradford Street and Dunlop Street to Essa Road and Mapleview Drive.
“The Essa Road & Bradford Street Corridor Study will act as the template for the approach to encouraging density and mixed-use development for the remainder of the intensification corridors,” the authors write.
Read the memo here.

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The search is on for a local band to perform at Barrie’s 21st annual Downtown Countdown, New Year’s Eve.
The act chosen will have the opportunity to play a 30-minute set at one of the largest New Year’s Eve celebrations in Central Ontario. Bands from Barrie and area that are suitable for this family event are invited to apply.
Submissions will be accepted until Monday, Oct. 1. Acts are asked to include contact information, a bio, and examples of their best audio/video for the selection committee to review. Submissions can include a press kit, CD(s), digital audio and video files, and/or direct link to a website, YouTube, SoundCloud, etc.
Submissions can be emailed to events@barrie.ca or dropped off at the Creative Economy Department, 56 Mulcaster Street (beside City Hall), Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Each year, more than 10,000 people attend the event in downtown Barrie to celebrate the arrival of a new year. The free evening of fun and entertainment for the whole family began in 1998 and has quickly become a New Year’s Eve tradition for the region. Festivities include skating, horse-drawn wagon rides, family activities, street performers, food vendors, and two fireworks displays.
The highlight of the night is a lineup of live entertainment featuring a special performance for kids, up-and-coming local talent, and a Canadian headline act. Past performers have included The Sheepdogs, The Trews, Sloan, April Wine, Big Wreck, Finger Eleven, Arkells and many more. This year’s lineup will be announced in late November.
For more information, visit barrie.ca/DowntownCountdown.

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“We don’t want our students to lose confidence in their abilities. Families need to recognize that the EQAO test is only one, very limited, tool to measure student outcomes. The government has recognized that there are limitations and concerns right across the province with the EQAO, which is why they are conducting a review.”  – Carol Corriveau-Truchon


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Testing results for the Simcoe Muskoka Catholic District School Board (SMCDSB) show student marks ranging from 82 per cent for Grade 6 reading to 34 per cent for Grade 9 applied mathematics.
The results come from the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) which released its province-wide testing results for schools and school boards. The new provincial government recently announced widespread consultation and a review of EQAO testing, assessment, evaluation and reporting practices, and foundational mathematics.
“We welcome the government’s proposed review because there seems to be a disconnect between how students are performing on these tests compared to the results we are seeing in other assessment areas,” Brian Beal, Director of Education, is quoted saying.
“We know that our teachers are doing an excellent job and that our students are working extremely hard – these scores in Grade six mathematics do not reflect the learning and achievement that takes place every day in our classrooms.”
The results for the Simcoe board are:
• Grade 3 reading:  71 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 3 writing: 67 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 3 mathematics: 51 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 reading: 82 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 writing: 77 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 mathematics: 39 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 9 applied mathematics: 34 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 9 academic mathematics: 77 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test: 74 per cent of first-time eligible students meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test: 40 per cent of previously eligible students meeting or exceeding the provincial standard.
Carol Corriveau-Truchon, chair of the school board, says she has witnessed first-hand the dedication of staff and students and that she knows some of these results may be disheartening.
“We don’t want our students to lose confidence in their abilities. Families need to recognize that the EQAO test is only one, very limited, tool to measure student outcomes. The government has recognized that there are limitations and concerns right across the province with the EQAO, which is why they are conducting a review.”

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A Barrie police cruiser sustained damage early Saturday morning while parked in downtown Barrie. Police are asking for the public’s help in locating the suspects.
While parked on Dunlop Street, east of Owen Street, about 2 a.m. the cruiser, say witnesses, was damaged when a male reportedly jumped up and down on top of it, followed by smashing out the rear window. The incident had been captured on video by a second male, who had been standing by recording it on his cell phone. The two men fled the area prior to police arriving, police report.
Anyone with information is asked contact Barrie Police Investigation Services at (705)725-7025 ext. 2129 or to remain anonymous contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or online at www.p3tips.com.

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Barrie police have arrested three suspects in regards to a robbery early Monday morning, and continue to seek a fourth.
Just after 4 a.m. on Monday police were called to Duckworth Plaza for a report of a robbery. When officers arrived they located and spoke with two victims, who indicated the suspects fled the area in a motor vehicle. The victims provided police with a description of the suspect vehicle.
Shortly after the vehicle was located at the intersection of Blake and St.Vincent streets, after the driver had lost control and crashed into a nearby park, police report, adding they arrested three suspects and are currently looking for an outstanding fourth suspect.
The suspect is described as being male, black (18 to 20), thin build, 6’, dark hair – dreadlocks, dark goatee, wearing beige pants, white long-sleeved shirt, and a sling on his right arm. Charges are pending and further information will be released as details become available.
Anyone with information is asked Barrie Police Investigative Services at 705-725-7025, ext. 2129 or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS(8477), or leave an anonymous tip online at www.p3tips.com

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Click on image for the staff report and the Cultural Heritage Strategy

The long-anticipated action plan for preserving local heritage is up for adoption by Barrie city council tonight. If approved the Cultural Heritage Strategy is to serve as a guide for Heritage Barrie and city staff.
A staff report recommends that the plan be approved and that further feedback be received from the “Métis Nation and other Indigenous Communities.”
As well as recommending approval of the plan, the report reviews the public consultation undertaken last October.

Some background

The strategy resulted from a council motion asking the then departments of culture, building, and planning services “to investigate developing a strategy for the protection of cultural heritage assets” in Barrie,” states the report prepared by senior planner Kathy Brislin. That initiative was followed up by a memo in October 2010 from the director of culture outling next steps, including the development of a heritage strategy.
“The process and work plan outlined in 2010 were not further resourced. Consequently, a Draft Strategy was prepared between 2011 and 2018 based on background research undertaken by Planning staff and feedback obtained through annual heritage stakeholders’ meetings hosted by Heritage Barrie over the past several years,” reads the report.
The strategy “was modelled on Victoria County’s (Australia) “Municipal Heritage Strategy: Guide for Councils,” and the City of Melbourne’s Heritage Strategy, a City known as one of the most livable cities in the world.”

Strategy has four pillars

Those pillars are knowing, protecting, managing and communicating, “with goals and action items flowing from each of these themes.” Public consultation began last fall with three drop-in sessions held to seek targeted feedback.
“Approximately 13 people attended and responded through the drop-in sessions and 40 people responded to the online survey. While the online survey was more effective in terms of the number of responses, the comment sheets completed in the drop-in sessions were more informative than the open-ended questions in the online survey,” states the report.
Although the feedback regarding the need for a strategy was generally positive,  at “the same time, concern was expressed with respect to lack of heritage protection in Barrie.” Other findings included:
• There is a strong interest in community engagement opportunities and increased protection of historical neighbourhoods
• Concerns were expressed about the impacts and potential impacts of development and intensification on heritage character
• Built form is important in preserving heritage character
• There is an appreciation of the place-making and aesthetic value of older historic buildings which are seen to contribute to Barrie’s uniqueness
• Archaeology and pre-1900 heritage is considered important
• Heritage is considered important to maintain the “small town” feel of the City
• Other ways of bringing heritage to life are considered important, such as re-enactments and celebrations. 

Feedback shows the need to discuss Barrie’s role as a regional urban centre

The public feedback points to “the importance of how planning policy and the development process play in heritage preservation.” The strategy, continues the report, “recommends a number of Official Plan policy changes based on planning policy gaps identified in the background report. These recommendations in the strategy were purposely not canvassed through the fall public consultation as these would be dealt with more fully in the new Official Plan update which will have its own public engagement process.”
The report addresses the “perception that heritage preservation is seen as maintaining” the small town feel of barre, bringing “to light a need for continued public discussion as to the City’s role as a regional ‘urban centre’ and the policy framework for maintaining and developing complete, healthy neighbourhoods, with heritage considerations included.”

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Click on image for Bath Fitter site

City council will consider a motion on Monday night to recognize financial donors of Meridian Place/Memorial Square, Barrie’s downtown concert and events venue, by naming various components of the park after them.
Among the names being considered:
• The Community Event Stage within Meridian Place be named “the Wildfire-Peacock Stage” for a period of 25 years in recognition of the Peacock Foundation’s sponsorship contribution of $250,000.
• The western promenade extending from Dunlop Street to Simcoe Street/Heritage Park will be named “Cullington Way” for a period of 25 years in recognition of Ms. Baldwin and Mr. Jepp’s sponsorship contribution of $100,000.
• The eastern promenade extending from Dunlop Street to Simcoe Street/Heritage Park to be named “’Pte. Frank Samuel Sivell Way” for a period of 25 years in recognition of Mr. and Mrs. Massie’s sponsorship contribution of $100,000.
• That the Kiwanis Club of Barrie be recognized with signage in the area of the Nine Mile Portage Tiers for a period of 25 years to identify the club’s sponsorship contribution of $175,000.
Some background:
Back in 2011, council approved in principle the Memorial Square Conceptual Design. Two years later, council approved the criteria for a contribution agreement with the Downtown Barrie Business Association (BIA) establishing conditions for the City’s participation in the redevelopment of Memorial Square Redevelopment with the City contributing one third towards the total shareable project costs, according to a staff report.
The BIA pledged one-third of the cost of the project and generously agreed to fundraise the remaining one-third.
Then in 2014, continues the report, council adopted a motion “regarding the Memorial Square Naming Rights and the inclusion of an Outdoor Performance Stage.” The motion approved Meridian Credit Union Limited as the title sponsor for the redevelopment project with naming rights for 25 years for the space stretching from the Memorial Square Cenotaph area to Heritage Park/Simcoe Street (named Meridian Place).
“As part of motion 14-G-219, the General Manager of Infrastructure and Growth Management was granted delegated authority to execute secondary sponsorship naming rights and contribution agreements within specific parameters. The secondary sponsorship naming rights related to elements within Memorial Square/Meridian Place.”
For more on this, read the staff report here.

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Roadwork is coming to Duckworth Street starting Monday, with the project to be completed in two phases. By the time it’s done about 1,500 metres of the street will be reconstructed, from Melrose Avenue to St. Vincent Street.
The first phase of construction will be from Napier Street to just north of Melrose. This section of Duckworth will be closed starting Monday until the end of November, weather depending, according to the City. Phase two will begin in spring 2019 from St. Vincent Street to Napier Avenue and should be completed by July 2019, weather depending.
The work involves:
• Replacement of the sanitary sewer and watermain
• Replacement of sanitary service laterals from the new sewer to property line
• Replacement of water services from the new watermain to property line
• Installation of a new local storm sewer system
• Reconstruction of the road surface including granular base, subdrains, concrete curb and gutter, and asphalt surface
• New sidewalk will be installed on the east side from Napier to Melrose.
Detours will be in place for vehicle traffic. Pedestrian and emergency access will be maintained during construction. Vehicle access to properties within the construction limits will be provided at almost all times throughout the construction period, however on various occasions direct access to driveways may be restricted.
Barrie Transit Route 3 will be on detour from Napier Street to Melrose Avenue. Please see barrie.ca/TransitNotices for details. For project updates, visit the Duckworth Street improvements page via barrie.ca/RoadAhead.

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