If included, the patio would add about 1,000 square feet to the existing 8,000 square feet on the terminal’s second floor


 

As part of the City’s arrangement with the Sandbox Entrepreneurship Centre to use the second floor of the downtown transit terminal, staff is recommending the extended rooftop space be included for use as an outdoor patio.
If approved by council, the use of the space would be subject to the centre meeting all building permit requirements and specified conditions of the lease, according to a staff report prepared by Karen Dubeau, director of the creative economy.
Last October council passed a motion supporting the creation of an entrepreneurship centre on the second floor of the terminal. The City agreed to provide an “in-kind contribution towards the initiative by waiving the rent and TUMI (taxes, insurance, maintenance and utilities) costs for the facility. As the vast majority of these costs are already included in the City’s base operating budget, there was no new financial impact to the tax base for the in-kind contribution,” states the report.
It continues that “as a means of protecting taxpayers and ensuring a return on investment made by the City in the form of free rent, taxes, utilities, maintenance and insurance in a publicly owned prime waterfront location, a report be presented to General Committee after the Sandbox’s first three years of operation assessing (its) ability to deliver value to the business, entrepreneurial and broader community, based on performance metrics to be determined.”
The outdoor patio, continues the report, “would add significant benefits to the overall attractiveness of the space … supporting the social and networking collisions intended for businesses and start-ups in the space. The proposed design includes replacing current windows on the south-side wall with larger windows for enhanced views of Kempenfelt Bay, and a large glass sliding door for access to the outdoor patio.”
If included, the patio would add about 1,000 square feet to the existing 8,000 square feet on the terminal’s second floor. The centre, continues the report, has been able to obtain “corporate funding and in-kind materials and services contributions to meet the capital requirements for the implementation of the proposed patio space. Therefore, there would be no financial implications to the City of Barrie’s capital plan.
“The inclusion of an attractive, outdoor patio space and larger windows will increase the overall marketability and property value of the space. The improvement is leveraging private sector dollars to benefit a municipal asset. The use of the space is consistent with, and supportive of, a downtown Creative Hub, and will act as an attractor to the space.”
For more, click here.

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This campus is a partnership between Barrie and County of Simcoe. Once complete, it will house the Barrie Police Service, Simcoe County Paramedic Services and Barrie Fire and Emergency Service dispatch communications in one location at 110 Fairview Road in Barrie.



 

Major site construction of the Barrie-Simcoe Emergency Services Campus is “ongoing and progressing well,” with hard construction costs currently 0.4 per cent under budget, relates a staff memo to council.
“Milestones to be completed prior to the end of 2018 include: total superstructure complete for Building A and foundations complete for Building C, preparation for site works and asphalt, installation of the communication tower, demobilization of both stationary cranes and making the south portion of building A weather tight,” states the memo, written by J. Liefl, manager of facility planning and development.
“Substantial and total project completion are on track to be completed December 2019 and January 2020 respectively.”
This campus is a partnership between Barrie and County of Simcoe. Once complete, it will house the Barrie Police Service, Simcoe County Paramedic Services and Barrie Fire and Emergency Service dispatch communications in one location at 110 Fairview Road in Barrie.
The memo continues that an application to the Municipal Greenhouse Gas Challenge Fund for $4,500,000 “based on proposed energy efficiencies of building mechanical systems at the new” campus was not selected.
Also, a new phosphorus offset policy has been launched by the Lake Simcoe Regional Conservation Authority (LSRCA). As of Jan. 1, 2018 all new developments are required to control 100 per cent of the phosphorus from leaving their property. Work was done to “review and revise the storm water management approach for the campus site,” relates the memo, with site plan approval being achieved on Aug. 22.
“The phosphorous offsetting program was not in place at the time of capital budget approval for the Campus in 2017. The City’s 10-year capital plan forecasts several engineering projects in close proximity, outside the limits of the site, which would result in a zero net phosphorous load, or potentially an offset credit.
“As the City is currently working through capital budget prioritization, it is not feasible at this time to make a specific project commitment, as Council prioritization and approvals will not be completed until March of 2019. The City is (committed) to continue working with the LSRCA … to determine the most suitable projects to be executed within two years of completion of the BSESC project, and … will continue to work with the LSRCA to make suitable arrangements to use any credits that have been generated through this agreement.”
For more on this, click here.

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Police investigate gunshot damage to abandoned home

Barrie police are appealing to the public for assistance after an abandoned home was damaged last Saturday.
Just before 8:30 a.m., police responded to a residence on Dunlop Street West after receiving a report from a witness who observed the front window of an abandoned home damaged as a result of bullet holes.
Investigators have confirmed the home was abandoned, and vacant at the time of the incident, and determined the damaged was a result of a single gunshot to the front window. Investigators canvassed that area and determined the incident occurred early Saturday morning between 2:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m.
There have been no reports of injuries as a result of the incident and the investigation is ongoing.
Anyone with information or who may have residential video surveillance is asked to contact Barrie Police Investigative Services at 705-725-7025, ext. 2129 or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or leave an anonymous tip online at www.p3tips.com

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The image illustrates the type of intensification envisioned along Essa Road and Bradford Street.

A renewal of Barrie’s Official Plan is anticipated to begin this fall, and as part of that process the 2009 Intensification Strategy will be updated.
The review will include an update to the targeted intensification of the Bradford Street/Essa Road corridor, council was informed in a memo prepared by Edward Terry, planner, and Jordan Lambie, senior urban designer.
The OP update, they write, will:
• Allow the City to confirm appropriate locations for nodes along Essa Road as well as additional updates to nodes and corridors
• Consider employment conversions along the corridor
• Explore the potential to designate Allandale GO Station and the New Barrie Transit Terminal as a mobility hub
• Pre-zone sites for mixed-use development along the reminder of the intensification corridors.
The intensification effort dates back to the province’s 2005 Places to Grow Act which “established long-term regional plans for growth, development and land-use policies across the province,” the memo explains.  The 2006 Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe determined population density targets and settlement patterns for Barrie, named in the provincial strategy as a ‘place to grow.’
“While the 2017 Growth Plan identified new targets, the mandate for intensification remains unchanged.”
To meet these directions, the City completed an Intensification Study in 2009 to identify key corridors that should accommodate higher density development.
Those corridors are Essa Road, Yonge Street, Bayfield Street, Dunlop Street West and Duckworth Street. The study assessed Barrie’s “capacity for meeting growth targets” in the province’s growth plan and “provided a vision and established priorities for achieving prescribed growth targets, while also recommending new Official Plan policies and performance standards” for the zoning bylaw “that would facilitate the type of development envisioned for the intensification areas,” continues the memo.
Guidelines set out in 2012 include intensification development that would:
• respectfully blend into the existing built fabric
• create an attractive and safe pedestrian realm
• support transportation of all types
• result in a thoughtful and attractive design that contributes to the local neighbourhoods and the City as a whole.
Policies included in the City’s OP would establish a framework for the design and development of mixed-use buildings in the intensification nodes and corridors, supporting “the creation of a vibrant complete community featuring a mix of uses and activities, with pedestrian oriented development designed to frame abutting sidewalks with active commercial uses located at the street level of new buildings.”
Intensification targets will be met through “short-term design that supports long-term development opportunities” and the “City will generally not support rezoning applications that result in a decrease of density or a reduction in the variety of uses on a property” in mixed-use areas, states the memo.
The scope of the study reaches from Bradford Street and Dunlop Street to Essa Road and Mapleview Drive.
“The Essa Road & Bradford Street Corridor Study will act as the template for the approach to encouraging density and mixed-use development for the remainder of the intensification corridors,” the authors write.
Read the memo here.

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The search is on for a local band to perform at Barrie’s 21st annual Downtown Countdown, New Year’s Eve.
The act chosen will have the opportunity to play a 30-minute set at one of the largest New Year’s Eve celebrations in Central Ontario. Bands from Barrie and area that are suitable for this family event are invited to apply.
Submissions will be accepted until Monday, Oct. 1. Acts are asked to include contact information, a bio, and examples of their best audio/video for the selection committee to review. Submissions can include a press kit, CD(s), digital audio and video files, and/or direct link to a website, YouTube, SoundCloud, etc.
Submissions can be emailed to events@barrie.ca or dropped off at the Creative Economy Department, 56 Mulcaster Street (beside City Hall), Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Each year, more than 10,000 people attend the event in downtown Barrie to celebrate the arrival of a new year. The free evening of fun and entertainment for the whole family began in 1998 and has quickly become a New Year’s Eve tradition for the region. Festivities include skating, horse-drawn wagon rides, family activities, street performers, food vendors, and two fireworks displays.
The highlight of the night is a lineup of live entertainment featuring a special performance for kids, up-and-coming local talent, and a Canadian headline act. Past performers have included The Sheepdogs, The Trews, Sloan, April Wine, Big Wreck, Finger Eleven, Arkells and many more. This year’s lineup will be announced in late November.
For more information, visit barrie.ca/DowntownCountdown.

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“We don’t want our students to lose confidence in their abilities. Families need to recognize that the EQAO test is only one, very limited, tool to measure student outcomes. The government has recognized that there are limitations and concerns right across the province with the EQAO, which is why they are conducting a review.”  – Carol Corriveau-Truchon


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Testing results for the Simcoe Muskoka Catholic District School Board (SMCDSB) show student marks ranging from 82 per cent for Grade 6 reading to 34 per cent for Grade 9 applied mathematics.
The results come from the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) which released its province-wide testing results for schools and school boards. The new provincial government recently announced widespread consultation and a review of EQAO testing, assessment, evaluation and reporting practices, and foundational mathematics.
“We welcome the government’s proposed review because there seems to be a disconnect between how students are performing on these tests compared to the results we are seeing in other assessment areas,” Brian Beal, Director of Education, is quoted saying.
“We know that our teachers are doing an excellent job and that our students are working extremely hard – these scores in Grade six mathematics do not reflect the learning and achievement that takes place every day in our classrooms.”
The results for the Simcoe board are:
• Grade 3 reading:  71 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 3 writing: 67 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 3 mathematics: 51 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 reading: 82 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 writing: 77 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 6 mathematics: 39 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 9 applied mathematics: 34 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Grade 9 academic mathematics: 77 per cent meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test: 74 per cent of first-time eligible students meeting or exceeding the provincial standard
• Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test: 40 per cent of previously eligible students meeting or exceeding the provincial standard.
Carol Corriveau-Truchon, chair of the school board, says she has witnessed first-hand the dedication of staff and students and that she knows some of these results may be disheartening.
“We don’t want our students to lose confidence in their abilities. Families need to recognize that the EQAO test is only one, very limited, tool to measure student outcomes. The government has recognized that there are limitations and concerns right across the province with the EQAO, which is why they are conducting a review.”

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A Barrie police cruiser sustained damage early Saturday morning while parked in downtown Barrie. Police are asking for the public’s help in locating the suspects.
While parked on Dunlop Street, east of Owen Street, about 2 a.m. the cruiser, say witnesses, was damaged when a male reportedly jumped up and down on top of it, followed by smashing out the rear window. The incident had been captured on video by a second male, who had been standing by recording it on his cell phone. The two men fled the area prior to police arriving, police report.
Anyone with information is asked contact Barrie Police Investigation Services at (705)725-7025 ext. 2129 or to remain anonymous contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or online at www.p3tips.com.

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Barrie police have arrested three suspects in regards to a robbery early Monday morning, and continue to seek a fourth.
Just after 4 a.m. on Monday police were called to Duckworth Plaza for a report of a robbery. When officers arrived they located and spoke with two victims, who indicated the suspects fled the area in a motor vehicle. The victims provided police with a description of the suspect vehicle.
Shortly after the vehicle was located at the intersection of Blake and St.Vincent streets, after the driver had lost control and crashed into a nearby park, police report, adding they arrested three suspects and are currently looking for an outstanding fourth suspect.
The suspect is described as being male, black (18 to 20), thin build, 6’, dark hair – dreadlocks, dark goatee, wearing beige pants, white long-sleeved shirt, and a sling on his right arm. Charges are pending and further information will be released as details become available.
Anyone with information is asked Barrie Police Investigative Services at 705-725-7025, ext. 2129 or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS(8477), or leave an anonymous tip online at www.p3tips.com

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Click on image for the staff report and the Cultural Heritage Strategy

The long-anticipated action plan for preserving local heritage is up for adoption by Barrie city council tonight. If approved the Cultural Heritage Strategy is to serve as a guide for Heritage Barrie and city staff.
A staff report recommends that the plan be approved and that further feedback be received from the “Métis Nation and other Indigenous Communities.”
As well as recommending approval of the plan, the report reviews the public consultation undertaken last October.

Some background

The strategy resulted from a council motion asking the then departments of culture, building, and planning services “to investigate developing a strategy for the protection of cultural heritage assets” in Barrie,” states the report prepared by senior planner Kathy Brislin. That initiative was followed up by a memo in October 2010 from the director of culture outling next steps, including the development of a heritage strategy.
“The process and work plan outlined in 2010 were not further resourced. Consequently, a Draft Strategy was prepared between 2011 and 2018 based on background research undertaken by Planning staff and feedback obtained through annual heritage stakeholders’ meetings hosted by Heritage Barrie over the past several years,” reads the report.
The strategy “was modelled on Victoria County’s (Australia) “Municipal Heritage Strategy: Guide for Councils,” and the City of Melbourne’s Heritage Strategy, a City known as one of the most livable cities in the world.”

Strategy has four pillars

Those pillars are knowing, protecting, managing and communicating, “with goals and action items flowing from each of these themes.” Public consultation began last fall with three drop-in sessions held to seek targeted feedback.
“Approximately 13 people attended and responded through the drop-in sessions and 40 people responded to the online survey. While the online survey was more effective in terms of the number of responses, the comment sheets completed in the drop-in sessions were more informative than the open-ended questions in the online survey,” states the report.
Although the feedback regarding the need for a strategy was generally positive,  at “the same time, concern was expressed with respect to lack of heritage protection in Barrie.” Other findings included:
• There is a strong interest in community engagement opportunities and increased protection of historical neighbourhoods
• Concerns were expressed about the impacts and potential impacts of development and intensification on heritage character
• Built form is important in preserving heritage character
• There is an appreciation of the place-making and aesthetic value of older historic buildings which are seen to contribute to Barrie’s uniqueness
• Archaeology and pre-1900 heritage is considered important
• Heritage is considered important to maintain the “small town” feel of the City
• Other ways of bringing heritage to life are considered important, such as re-enactments and celebrations. 

Feedback shows the need to discuss Barrie’s role as a regional urban centre

The public feedback points to “the importance of how planning policy and the development process play in heritage preservation.” The strategy, continues the report, “recommends a number of Official Plan policy changes based on planning policy gaps identified in the background report. These recommendations in the strategy were purposely not canvassed through the fall public consultation as these would be dealt with more fully in the new Official Plan update which will have its own public engagement process.”
The report addresses the “perception that heritage preservation is seen as maintaining” the small town feel of barre, bringing “to light a need for continued public discussion as to the City’s role as a regional ‘urban centre’ and the policy framework for maintaining and developing complete, healthy neighbourhoods, with heritage considerations included.”

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Click on image for Bath Fitter site

City council will consider a motion on Monday night to recognize financial donors of Meridian Place/Memorial Square, Barrie’s downtown concert and events venue, by naming various components of the park after them.
Among the names being considered:
• The Community Event Stage within Meridian Place be named “the Wildfire-Peacock Stage” for a period of 25 years in recognition of the Peacock Foundation’s sponsorship contribution of $250,000.
• The western promenade extending from Dunlop Street to Simcoe Street/Heritage Park will be named “Cullington Way” for a period of 25 years in recognition of Ms. Baldwin and Mr. Jepp’s sponsorship contribution of $100,000.
• The eastern promenade extending from Dunlop Street to Simcoe Street/Heritage Park to be named “’Pte. Frank Samuel Sivell Way” for a period of 25 years in recognition of Mr. and Mrs. Massie’s sponsorship contribution of $100,000.
• That the Kiwanis Club of Barrie be recognized with signage in the area of the Nine Mile Portage Tiers for a period of 25 years to identify the club’s sponsorship contribution of $175,000.
Some background:
Back in 2011, council approved in principle the Memorial Square Conceptual Design. Two years later, council approved the criteria for a contribution agreement with the Downtown Barrie Business Association (BIA) establishing conditions for the City’s participation in the redevelopment of Memorial Square Redevelopment with the City contributing one third towards the total shareable project costs, according to a staff report.
The BIA pledged one-third of the cost of the project and generously agreed to fundraise the remaining one-third.
Then in 2014, continues the report, council adopted a motion “regarding the Memorial Square Naming Rights and the inclusion of an Outdoor Performance Stage.” The motion approved Meridian Credit Union Limited as the title sponsor for the redevelopment project with naming rights for 25 years for the space stretching from the Memorial Square Cenotaph area to Heritage Park/Simcoe Street (named Meridian Place).
“As part of motion 14-G-219, the General Manager of Infrastructure and Growth Management was granted delegated authority to execute secondary sponsorship naming rights and contribution agreements within specific parameters. The secondary sponsorship naming rights related to elements within Memorial Square/Meridian Place.”
For more on this, read the staff report here.

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Roadwork is coming to Duckworth Street starting Monday, with the project to be completed in two phases. By the time it’s done about 1,500 metres of the street will be reconstructed, from Melrose Avenue to St. Vincent Street.
The first phase of construction will be from Napier Street to just north of Melrose. This section of Duckworth will be closed starting Monday until the end of November, weather depending, according to the City. Phase two will begin in spring 2019 from St. Vincent Street to Napier Avenue and should be completed by July 2019, weather depending.
The work involves:
• Replacement of the sanitary sewer and watermain
• Replacement of sanitary service laterals from the new sewer to property line
• Replacement of water services from the new watermain to property line
• Installation of a new local storm sewer system
• Reconstruction of the road surface including granular base, subdrains, concrete curb and gutter, and asphalt surface
• New sidewalk will be installed on the east side from Napier to Melrose.
Detours will be in place for vehicle traffic. Pedestrian and emergency access will be maintained during construction. Vehicle access to properties within the construction limits will be provided at almost all times throughout the construction period, however on various occasions direct access to driveways may be restricted.
Barrie Transit Route 3 will be on detour from Napier Street to Melrose Avenue. Please see barrie.ca/TransitNotices for details. For project updates, visit the Duckworth Street improvements page via barrie.ca/RoadAhead.

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Helpful citizen assists police locate two suspects

A helpful citizen assisted police apprehend two suspects who had fled when an officer attempted to stop their vehicle.
On Tuesday, Sept. 11 around noon an officer on general patrol in the area of Blake Street attempted to stop a vehicle after it was suspected the driver had a suspended licence. As soon as the traffic stop was initiated with police lights activated, the vehicle fled, police report.
Within four minutes the vehicle was located by police, abandoned, just over a kilometre from where the officer attempted to stop it, at a residential complex on Codrington Street. A witness felt the two males exiting the vehicle appeared suspicious so when officers surrounded the vehicle in the complex parking lot, he approached police and offered them some insight in the direction the suspects fled.
At this point it was also determined the vehicle they were travelling in had been reported stolen the previous day from an address in Oro-Medonte.
Officers combing the area quickly located the two males walking down Codrington Street and once they saw police, one suspect began to run. The officer was able to catch up to him and he was placed under arrest, along with his more-compliant co-accused, all within seven minutes of the attempted traffic stop on Blake Street.
The running suspect was found to be in possession of keys belonging to the stolen vehicle that they had just abandoned, police report. While being processed, police became aware the suspect driving had ingested methamphetamine and was operating the vehicle impaired by drug, police report. He was issued the Drug Recognition Evaluation Demand and subsequently refused to comply with the demand.
The driver, a 34-year-old Orillia man, has been charged with Flight from Police, Possession of Stolen Property Over $5,000, Failure or Refusal to Comply with Demand, Failure to Comply with Probation Order. The passenger, a 36-year-old Severn-Township man, has been charged with Possession of Stolen Property Over $5,000.

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Barrie residents are being reminded that they must be on the voters’ list if they want to cast a ballot for the coming municipal election.
To ensure they are on the list, residents can:
• Go to barrie.ca/VoterLookup
• Call 705-728-VOTE (8683) from Monday to Friday, 8:30 – 4:30 p.m.
• Visit Legislative & Court Services (1st floor City Hall, 70 Collier Street) Monday to Friday, 8:30 – 4:30 p.m.
To be on the list and vote in the municipal election, you must be a Canadian citizen, at least 18 years of age, a resident of Barrie or a non-resident owner or tenant of land in Barrie (or their spouse), and not be prohibited from voting under any law.
An eligible elector can add their name or update their list information by completing an Application to Amend the Voters’ List (available at barrie.ca/election or Legislative & Court Services, 1st floor City Hall). Completed original forms must be returned in person (with acceptable identification) or by mail (with a photocopy of acceptable identification) to: City of Barrie, Legislative & Court Services, City Hall, 70 Collier Street, P.O. Box 400 Barrie ON, L4M 4T5.
Additions or changes to the list are permitted up to and including final voting day (Oct. 22). For more information on the 2018 Municipal Election including a full candidate listing please visit barrie.ca/election.

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Making waves – September days, Kempenfelt Bay, Barrie

Making waves – September days, Kempenfelt Bay, Barrie


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Barrie presents second annual Game On festival

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Gamers will be anticipating the second annual Game On!, a free festival of gaming, technology, creativity and innovation.
The festival is being hosted by the City of Barrie and is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 22. It is being held in partnership with the Barrie Public Library’s Comic Con and features retro gaming, video game competitions, virtual reality and more.
“Game On! is a unique opportunity to showcase local businesses and the talented people involved in game development, technology and art, while providing a fun and engaging opportunity for people to try their hand at gaming, meet local game developers and learn more about this evolving industry in Barrie,” Karen Dubeau, Director of the Creative Economy, is quoted saying.
Planned for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Five Points Theatre and presented by Pratt Homes and Development, attendees can:
• Watch registered participants face off in a Rocket League video game competition for the chance to win a prize sponsored by Barrie-based tech company Vertex VR. Must be 16+ to enter this competition. E-mail events@barrie.ca to register
• Battle it out in Dr. Mario and Super Smash Bros. Nintendo 64 competitions for the chance to win prizes sponsored by Barrie’s Power Up Gaming and local YouTube channel, RekAllTheThings
• Explore video game stations featuring a variety of games from classic and retro to new generation VR, sponsored by Vertex VR and Power Up Gaming
• Meet local video game developers and learn what it’s like working in the industry, and how to get involved.  Vendors will also be onsite showcasing video game related artwork, technology and more.
Meanwhile, at the City Hall Rotunda the action involves:
• Work with BRIX (Barrie’s Makerspace Group) to craft your own cardboard sword, shield and armour
• Visit the medieval swordplay training area to learn from the pros and practice your medieval fighting skills.
Attendees are encouraged to travel to each Game On! location and Comic Con at the Library’s downtown branch to complete bonus quest activities for the chance to win prizes. The event is free and open to all ages.
For more information visit facebook.com/CreativeBarrie. Share the event through social media using the hashtag #CreativeBarrie. For more information about the Barrie Public Library’s Comic Con, visit the Program & Events section via barrielibrary.ca.

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Committee gives nod to downtown Barrie condo development

A proposed 20-storey mixed-use development across from the Barrie Public Library is one step closer to reality after the city’s general committee approved the project in principle, Monday night at City Hall.
It comes up at next Monday’s council meeting for final approval.
The plan calls for the construction of two buildings on the site along Worsley, Owen and MacDonald streets in downtown Barrie, across from the library. The 20-storey component of the plan would be located on the southern part of the site, and would include street-level retail. The northern part of the site would see the construction of an eight-storey building with eight townhouse units at street level within a three-storey podium base, fronting onto McDonald Street and Owen Street.
The two buildings would be connected by a nine-storey mid-rise building.
“Retail accesses will be located off of Owen Street and Worsley Street. Primary residential entrances and lobbies will front onto Owen Street and the proposed internal private driveway from Owen Street. The ‘townhouse’ units within the building podium will have individual accesses from McDonald Street and Owen Street,” committee was informed by a staff report.
The plan to rezone the site to allow the project to proceed was submitted by MacNaughton Hermsen Britton Clarkson Planning Limited (MHBC) on behalf of Barrie Owen Service Inc. It includes the provision of $475,000 which would be used for:
• $150,000 for public safety and public realm improvements at the public plaza in front of the Downtown Public Library which employs Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) strategies and best practices
•  $100,000 for public realm improvements to the nearby Coupe and/or Lions Park
• $75,000 for street furnishing improvements in the downtown (e.g. garbage cannisters)
• $75,000 for the development of a strategic Public Art Master Plan
• $75,000 for developing processes and providing supplies for creative construction hoarding improvements and beautification (to include graffiti-resistant public art), to be applied to future developments throughout the downtown and wider city.
Residential capacity has yet to be decided, but the minimum calls for 289 units, and a maximum of 329 units. According to the report, the additional units “would be gained by converting some parking spaces in the podium building.”
Prior to the development of the site, the applicant will be required to submit a site plan, “required to provide the City of Barrie with a comprehensive understanding of the proposed development and its architectural, landscape and engineering details.”
Currently, the property has a split zoning, with the northern half zoned Transition Centre Commercial (C2) and the southern half zoned Transition Centre Commercial with site specific provision (C2-1). The site is located within the Urban Growth Centre, with a minimum-density target of 150 people and jobs per hectare for the subject lands.
Read the staff report here.

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Police charge driver after he returns to his vehicle

A Hawkestone resident, 18, is facing numerous criminal charges following a motor vehicle collision, which occurred in Barrie on Monday, Sept. 10, police report.
The non-licenced driver had been driving his girlfriend’s motor vehicle when he caught the attention of police while travelling the wrong way on a one way street. Police attempted to stop the vehicle, but the driver failed to stop and fled from police, heading north towards Dunlop Street and onto Berczy Street, police report.
As a result of driving displayed by the driver, police did not engage the vehicle any further. About 15 minutes later, the vehicle was located on Simcoe Street with a flat tire. A nearby witness advised police the driver had fled the area on foot, and also provided a description of the driver.
The driver returned to the scene and was arrested and charged with Dangerous Driving, Flight from Police, Fail to Stop at a Scene of an Accident, and Fail to Comply with Probation. He is is scheduled to appear in a Barrie Youth Court in October.

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The quick response of local citizens helped get a suspected impaired driver off the road, police report.
On Friday, Sept. 7 at 7:10 p.m. a male driving a large pick-up truck pulled into the parking lot of a Tim Horton’s and attempted to reverse into a parking spot. While reversing, police report, the truck struck a light post positioned up on the curb. The driver then pulled forward to adjust and again reversed into the light post a second.
He exited the vehicle and witnesses saw the male stumble into the store, to exit a short time later with a coffee in one hand and his car keys in the other. Police were called as one witness on scene confronted the male, demanding his keys as they did not feel it was safe for him to drive, police report. When police arrived the male was sitting inside the front seat of the vehicle, however the concerned citizen was in possession of the car keys.
An area man, 65, was arrested and taken to the Barrie Police Service where his blood alcohol levels were recorded at over double the legal limit. He was was charged with Operation of a Motor Vehicle with Over 80mgs of Alcohol and will attend count later this month to answer to his charge. The charge also resulted in the male’s licence to be suspended and his vehicle impounded.

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UPDATE: Early Monday afternoon police located the rightful owner of an envelope containing Canadian currency. The envelope had been found by police on Thursday, Sept. 6 in the area of Shirley Street and Anne Street. Thank you to the local media and our social media followers for your assistance.


Barrie police are looking for the rightful owner of an envelope containing Canadian currency, found on Thursday, Sept. 6.
The envelope was located in the area of Shirley Street and Anne Street North. If you are the owner(s), please be advised you will be expected to provide the following details:

  • How much was lost and what denominations
  • The exact time and place you noticed the money was gone
  • Any identifying marks on the envelope
  • Your name and contact information

The owner or anyone with information is asked contact PC Westcott at 705-725-7025 ext. 2410, or jwestcott@barriepolice.ca.

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Another community garden is being planted in Barrie, this one at Shear Park. If approved by city council it will be Barrie’s third, with the other two being the Sunnidale Park garden and the Golden Meadow Park garden.
A staff report to general committee recommends adoption of the proposal and that engineering department staff work with the Urban Pantry to get the garden growing this fall. The existing gardens are “consistently fully rented every year,” informs the report.
“In 2018, the Sunnidale garden was fully rented by May 25 and currently has one name on the wait list. It is a challenging site due to the lack of water supply, and aggravated by severe gopher intrusions from the natural area but feedback and continuing registration continues to confirm existing demand despite these barriers.
“The Golden Meadow garden offers a water supply. It was fully rented by January 30, 2018 and as of August 21, 2018 has a wait list of 3 people. The City also receives requests from registered gardeners to rent additional plots within their garden.”
The Community Garden Program dates back to March 25, 2015 when council adopted a recommendation that said:
• That the Sunnidale Park and Golden Meadow Park Community Gardens continue as a pilot program in 2013
• That staff make best efforts to obtain non-tax based external funding and sponsorship for the continued implementation of the community garden program
• That staff actively continue to investigate additional sites for consideration as future project sites
• That accessible garden plots be approved in principle for consideration in the Golden Meadow Park Community Garden and that they be implemented in the future, where feasible, and where non-tax based funding can be obtained for their construction.
The Urban Pantry, a project under the Canadian Mental Health Association), approached staff in March of this year “with Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) grant funding for the construction of a new community garden” in the Barrie, according to the report. The grant allowed for the contracting of an Urban Agriculture Development (UAD) co-ordinator “to assist with the design and opening of five new community gardens” over the next three years starting in 2018.
City staff worked with the co-ordinator to develop criteria for site selection, which included:
• Existing yard hydrant for water supply
• Underserviced areas (northeast, central and southwest areas of the city)
• Underutilized parkland
• Sun exposure
• Level area for barrier-free accessibility and drop curb/ roll curb availability
• Impact on adjacent residential properties
• Connections to transit
• Available parking
• Community interest
• Distance from natural area wildlife
• Adjacent residential housing densities.
Shear Park was among five considered, with the others being Eastview Community Park, Queens Park, Blair Park, Bear Creek Park.
For more on this, read the staff report here.

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“The impacts of the change in retail distribution model from a land use planning perspective can have significant impacts on the City of Barrie. The City’s existing planning documents do not contemplate the retail sale of cannabis. Consequently, there are no existing locational criteria that would regulate the retail sale of cannabis across the City.”


The province’s new approach to the retailing of cannabis could require changes to the zoning bylaw to accommodate what may be multiple stores in municipalities, Mayor Jeff Lehman and council are being advised.
Ontario’s new Progressive Conservative government changed course from the previous Liberal government’s approach to the retailing of cannabis. The Liberals had intended to have the product sold at government stores only, but the recently elected PCs have changed that policy to permit private sales.
“The change in … policy may permit the opening of multiple stores in each municipality, meaning zoning bylaw changes may be required to ensure the orderly development and operation of cannabis retail stores,” Kathy Suggitt, manager of Strategic Initiatives, Policy and Analysis, advised the mayor and council in a memorandum.
The province, she continues, “has stated they will undertake extensive consultation with municipalities to determine the appropriate measures to put in place regarding the retail distribution of cannabis. Municipalities will have the opportunity to opt out but no details have been provided.”
Last year the federal government passed the Cannabis Act, governing the production, distribution and sale of recreational cannabis. Provinces and territories are responsible for the retail model, distribution and wholesaling, and retail locations and rules.
“Meanwhile, municipalities are responsible for land use/zoning and retail locations and rules (within the scope of the legislation),” continues Suggitt.
As originally proposed by the last government, the sale of recreational cannabis would have been through a government-run company, the Ontario Cannabis Store. The province had selected a number of cities where stores would be located, and as a “result of their approach, a single, government owned and operated retail location was proposed for the City of Barrie, and it was believed that Zoning Bylaw amendments or other municipal bylaw amendments would not be required.
“The impacts of the change in retail distribution model from a land use planning perspective can have significant impacts on the City of Barrie. The City’s existing planning documents do not contemplate the retail sale of cannabis. Consequently, there are no existing locational criteria that would regulate the retail sale of cannabis across the City,” writes Suggitt.
Cannabis stores would fall under the definition of general retail stores, which are a “permitted use across all commercial zones as well as in other zones as an accessory use.”
Other provinces which have opted for private sales of cannabis have suggested a number of bylaw amendments that may assist municipalities, including:
• Municipalities may add definitions to bylaws which are consistent with provincial and federal definitions
• Retail cannabis sales may be excluded from certain areas of a municipality such as tourist areas, heritage districts or “main streets”
• A buffer, or minimum separation distance, may be established between any cannabis related facility and other sensitive land uses (such as schools, recreation facilities, residential areas, etc.)
• Municipalities may restrict operating hours of cannabis related facilities (although the Province has indicated they intend to do so)
• Municipalities may determine specific parking requirements for cannabis related facilities
• Municipalities may require a business license.
“A full technical analysis of the planning issues must be completed if zoning bylaw amendment is to be defended under the Planning Act requirements. Staff anticipate that this topic will create significant interest from those proponents interested in establishing retail stores as well as the broader community. With the date that cannabis will become legal in Canada set for October 17, 2018, this will be a high priority matter to ensure the City of Barrie is prepared for the legalization of cannabis and for retail sales come April 1, 2019,” writes Suggitt.
Read the memo here.

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Grab and dash foiled by attentive employee: police

Two suspects are facing theft charges thanks to the attentiveness of an employee, Barrie police report.
On Sunday, Sept. 2 about 9:41 a.m., police were called to the Duckworth Plaza for a theft that had just occurred. The young employee working the Hewitt’s Farm stand told police two females approached her, one asking questions from one side of the stand and then the other drawing her attention to the opposite side of the stand to distract her.
The first female then snuck behind the table, grabbing the cash box. Both females immediately fled the scene in the same vehicle the came in, police report.
Quick thinking from the employee resulted in photos of the suspect and the vehicle they were driving being captured. The victim was also able to provide excellent descriptors and details on both the suspects and the car, which was relayed to all officers working patrol on the road at the time.
A short time later a general patrol officer noted a vehicle matching the suspects’ vehicle parked in the parking lot of a plaza on Cundles Road East. The females inside also matched the description passed on from investigating officers.
A 42-year-old Orillia female was charged with Theft Under $5000. The second suspect, a 27-year-old Orillia female, was charged with Theft Under $5000 and Breach Probation. Both were released with future court dates to answer to their charges.
The cash box was recovered and returned to the owner however the outstanding float of $70 was missing from the box.

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Barrie man dies after being struck by vehicle

Barrie police are investigating the death of a Barrie man following a collision wth a vehicle, early Thursday morning.
Shortly after 5:00 a.m., officers responded to a collision on Townline Road (Hwy 27) between Red Oak Drive and Mapleview Drive, West, involving a motor vehicle and a pedestrian. The pedestrian, police report, had been walking on the roadway when he was struck by a motor vehicle travelling on Townline Road. The pedestrian, a 30-year-old man from Barrie, succumbed to his injuries at the scene.
The driver of the motor vehicle, a 21-year-old man from Barrie, remained on scene and police were contacted. He was not physically injured.
The investigation is ongoing.
Anyone with information is asked to contact Constable Allport of the Barrie Police Service at 705-725-7025, ext. 2913, callport@barriepolice.ca or call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or leave an anonymous tip online at www.p3tips.com.
In other news, Barrie police have concluded their investigation in connection with a collision that occurred at the corner of Shirley Avenue, and Anne Street North.
On Friday, August 24 at 11:30 a.m., police responded to a two-vehicle collision. The car had been travelling westbound on Shirley Avenue, and entered Anne Street North when it was struck by a pick-up truck travelling northbound.
The driver of the car, an 85-year-old woman from Barrie, was taken to a local hospital and later airlifted to a GTA hospital, in critical condition. Sadly, she succumbed to her injuries, police report.

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Barrie Transit is introducing two new routes that, managers say, will get riders to their destinations quicker and allow for a later night out.
Route 100 – Georgian Express Route is already running while a new Late Night Loop route starts Sept. 7.
“Thanks to the U-Pass partnership with Georgian College, we have thousands more transit riders beginning this week,” Brent Forsyth, Director of Transit, is quoted saying. “As a result of this increase, we’ve worked to come up with new routes that will improve service to and from the College, making transit more convenient. We will continue to monitor usage and will add more buses/routes as required.”
On April 30 city council approved a Universal Transit Pass (U-Pass) for Georgian College. The U-Pass program launches this semester. Nearly 16,500 students are eligible for the fall, winter and summer semesters at Georgian College. Council also approved an additional 1,000 service hours to and from Georgian College to accommodate the anticipated ridership increase associated with the implementation of the U-Pass.
|The Georgian Express will operate between downtown and Georgian College from 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., stopping at popular stops along the way. The route extends to Georgian Mall in addition to servicing downtown and Georgian College from 2:30 to 10 p.m.
The Late Night Loop follows Route 8 in two loops to and from downtown on Friday and Saturday night only. The first clockwise loop will depart the transit terminal at 12:50 a.m. The second counter-clockwise loop will depart the transit terminal at 1:50 a.m.
“I think it’s great they’re providing us the opportunity,” Barrie Campus Georgian College Students’ Association President Jonah Brandridge is quoted saying. “They realize students are an important part of Barrie, especially in the north end. The new routes are adaptable and flexible, and as things come up, and new changes are needed, we’ll be able to implement those changes.”
To see new routes and maps, visit www.barrie.ca/TransitNotices. Go to MyRideBarrie.ca to view Barrie Transit bus locations in real time, get departure times and save your favourite routes.

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Walk a Mile in Her Shoes set for Sept 15 at Heritage Park

The Women and Children’s Shelter of Barrie has launched a $350,000 project to bridge what it calls a “gap between emergency shelter and outreach programs.”
The shelter maintains a 27-bed location for women who have left an abusive relationship and a separate off-site location for women in the community who seek outreach support. The shelter basement will soon undergo major renovations to transform the current insufficient storage area into a welcoming office space to include a brand-new ventilation system, offices and a large boardroom with a kitchenette.
For more information, watch the attached video and click here. And be sure to remember the shelter is organizing its annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes, Saturday, Sept 15 at Heritage Park.
“Prizes are available to be won for best shoes, most spirited team, as well as most spirited youth!” says the shelter. Register here.

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